Slovakia

ADEL: Dance workshop and crafts & folk art workshop

 

Two different workshops were organised as part of the YOU ARE WELCOME project in Slovakia: a traditional Slovak dance lesson, in early September 2018; and a crafts and folk art workshop in early October 2018.

Traditional Slovak Dance Lesson

The main idea behind this event was to create a space where foreigners could learn the basics of traditional Slovak folk dances. Altogether, 14 people participated, coming from eight different countries: Germany, France, Croatia, the United States, Italy, Nicaragua, Saudi Arabia and Slovakia.

The dance lesson was facilitated by three Slovak youngsters versed in traditional Slovak dances. They did not know each other before, which made it necessary to arrange a preparatory meeting in which they could discuss what and how to teach, etc.
Depending on the energy of the participants, we were implementing energisers and other activities to make the workshop more dynamic. For instance, we screened videos about various traditional dances and music.
After the dance lesson, we all went together for a traditional Slovak dinner where we all had a chance to taste various Slovak national dishes – e.g. dumplings and pierogies with sheep cheese or sauerkraut.
We launched an evaluation sheet so the attendants could give their opinions about the activity. All of them shared a positive feedback about the event, with its duration (three hours) and dinner. The feedback also pointed out that the main topic of the workshop was considered quite relevant. In addition to this, the participants also stated that the atmosphere was nice and comfortable for interaction and that they had a good time. The learning outcomes were presented in an experienced, funny way.

Workshop about Traditional Slovak Crafts and Folk Art

Our second workshop was organised in cooperation with the Centre for Folk Art Production and it focused on traditional Slovak crafts and folk art. During the workshop, participants had a chance to get information about craftsmanship, materials and working tools. There were two options for crafts they could practice: wirework and glass painting.
Both sessions were held in two rooms that were next to each other. This way, the participants had a chance to interact with people in the other group as well. Together, there were eleven people from six countries (Israel, Italy, Ukraine, Spain, Slovenia and Slovakia).
Each participant made a product that they could keep as a souvenir or give to somebody as a gift. The group that was doing wirework prepared a heart and those who were painting on the glass chose different pictures.

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